Advances in HIV co-infection research and treatment

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In recognition of the need for greater attention to the growing toll on people living with HIV co-infections, the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) will feature the latest developments on tools for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of HIV co-infections. The programme will share research results, important clinical developments and updates on ongoing and new studies in the field of HIV and co-infections, particularly tuberculosis and viral hepatitis.

Take a look below for some exciting AIDS 2016 highlights in co-infections and we look forward to seeing you in Durban.


Scientific Session Highlights

Programme highlights with some of the latest scientific findings include: 

  • Compelling findings on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treatment in HIV co-infection
  • Key insights into barriers and challenges around HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) intellectual property regimes
  • The latest results from trials of new direct-acting agents for hepatitis C for patients with HIV-HCV co-infection
  • New discoveries in mortality rates for HIV and hepatitis B (HBV) co-infection with elevated HBV replication
  • Promising results from fixed dose combination trials among genotypes 1-6 HCV-infected patients 
  • Developments in achieving HBV viral load suppression among HIV and HBV co-infected pregnant women 


Conference Session Highlights

Highlights from some of the sessions, meetings, and speakers include: 

  • TB2016, a two-day conference focused excusively on tuberculosis – co-chaired by Haileyesus Getahun, WHO, Jens Lundgren, University of Copenhagen, and Valerie Mizrahi, University of Cape Town
  • 3rd International HIV/Viral Hepatitis Co-infection Meeting, focused on increasing optimal treatment of viral heptatitis in people living with HIV, with speakers including Jürgen Rockstroh, University of Bonn and Marina Klein, McGill University
  • Noteworthy plenaries, including: “TB and Co-infections, Co-morbidities: The Long Game” by Anton Pozniak, Chelsea and Westminister Hospital; “Diagnosis of HIV-associated TB: Translating new knowledge and tools to maximize clinical impact” by Stephen Lawn, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine





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